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A RARE 17TH CENTURY ENGLISH OAK MANTLE OR BRESSUMER BEAM. THE CLERE FAMILY.DATED 1674.

THIS BEAUTIFULLY CARVED OAK BEAM FROM ABOVE A FIREPLACE IS CENTRED BY A CARTOUCHE BEARING THE DATE 1674, EACH SIDE FLANKED BY SERPENTS. TO THE LEFT AND RIGHT A SHIELD BEARS THE ARMS OF THE CLERE FAMILY.

Clere is a name that first reached England following the Norman Conquest of 1066. The Clere family lived in Suffolk. The family was originally from Clere, in Vexin, Normandy. The family de Clare were Norman lords who were descended from Richard fitz Gilbert, who accompanied William the Conqueror into England during the Norman Conquest. The family received huge estates including Clare, now a small town Suffolk; and Tonbridge, now a market town in Kent for their efforts. [1]

The parish of St. Cleer in Cornwall is an important location for the family. "The name of this parish is derived from a celebrated female saint called Clare, to whom the church is dedicated, and who is presumed to be its tutelar guardian. She was born of an honourable family in Italy, and having rendered herself famous for the austerity of her manners, she set up a college of virgins, which, after her name were called the order of the Poor Clares of St. Benedict, under the solemn vows of obedience, poverty, and chastity, according to the rule of St. Francis. St. Clare died in the year 1252, aged 70. Now by the death of St. Clare, St. Francis, and St. Benedict, says Hals, may be nearly computed the ages of those churches dedicated to them, and bearing their names in this county. From this parish was denominated an ancient family of gentlemen surnamed De St. Cleare, from whence are descended the St. Cleares of Tudwell, in Devonshire."

PRIVATE ENGLISH COLLECTION.

WONDERFUL COLOUR AND PATINATION.

STOCK NO 1893.


Dimensions:
Height: 12 inches (30.5 cms)
Width: 56 inches (142.2 cms)

£3,950

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